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Foods That Neutralize Seasonal Allergy Symptoms

Foods That Neutralize Seasonal Allergy Symptoms

Foods That Neutralize Seasonal Allergy Symptoms – This seasonal allergy is certainly different from the usual allergies, this natural allergy is not an acute disease, this seasonal allergy can come at certain times.

Seasonal allergies are also known as hay fever or allergic rhinitis. This allergy is not caused by cross-reactivity due to food, but due to seasonal factors and occurs at certain times of the year.

Seasonal allergies make the immune system overreact to allergens. For example, plant pollen when flowers are in bloom which causes nasal congestion, itching and frequent sneezing.

1. Tomato

The red fruit with a round shape has no doubt about its usefulness. Containing lycopene, which is an antioxidant compound that helps the body deal with systemic inflammation, making tomatoes a food that minimizes symptoms of seasonal allergies.

Often complementing a delicious meal, tomatoes can be enjoyed on their own or made into a refreshing drink.

2. Ginger

Spices that also play a role in increasing endurance can also help minimize seasonal allergies. Based on the results of research conducted in 2016, ginger suppresses the production of pro-inflammatory proteins in the blood, which causes a reduction in allergy symptoms.

The results of this study are reinforced by the fact that ginger contains antioxidants in the form of anti-inflammatory phytochemical compounds that can overcome a number of health problems. Make it a cup of warm ginger, could be an option!

3. Citrus fruit

One of the characteristics of seasonal allergies is a cold caused by pollen from blooming plants. Enjoying citrus is the solution because the fruit has a sweet and sour taste it contains vitamin C.

The vitamin C in citrus fruits shortens the duration of colds and restores the immune system, as well as offering many other benefits for allergy sufferers.

Also Read:Hollywood Artist Sufferers with Extreme Allergies

4. Salmon

The more eicosapantaenoic fatty acid (EPA) in the bloodstream, the lower the risk of allergic sensitivity. This sentence is reinforced by a study conducted in 2005 in Germany.

Fatty acids also help reduce the narrowing of the airways that occurs with asthma and in some cases due to seasonal allergies. These fatty acids can be found in seafood such as salmon.

5. Garlic

The aroma of garlic is quite pungent, but it has properties, one of which is to minimize the symptoms of seasonal allergies. The quercetin in garlic acts as a natural anthistamine that can reduce symptoms of seasonal allergies.

Even more nutritious because garlic contains a number of anti-inflammatory compounds and other antioxidants.…

Healthy Foods That Can Trigger Allergies

Healthy Foods That Can Trigger Allergies

Healthy Foods That Can Trigger Allergies – Healthy food is usually a food that must be consumed by everyone, but without realizing it, healthy food can sometimes be one of the triggers for allergies.

A food allergy is a condition when the body shows an abnormal immune response after consuming certain foods. Food allergies are caused by an error in the body’s immune system in identifying some proteins in food as a danger. As a result, the body then performs various protective measures, such as releasing chemicals that trigger inflammation.

For people with food allergies, even small amounts of allergen exposure can cause an allergic reaction. Unfortunately, sometimes foods that trigger allergens are superfoods that are known to be nutritious.

1. Cow’s milk

Cow’s milk allergy is most common in infants and young children, especially if they are fed cow’s milk before the age of six months. These allergies affect 2 to 3 percent of babies and toddlers. Fortunately, about 90 percent of allergy cases in children are resolved by the time they are three years old.

Individuals who have an IgE allergy will show symptoms such as swelling, rash, hives, vomiting, and anaphylaxis. Meanwhile, non-IgE allergies include vomiting, constipation or diarrhea, and inflammation of the intestinal wall.

For individuals diagnosed with cow’s milk allergy, they should not only avoid cow’s milk but also cow’s milk-based products, such as powdered milk, cheese, yogurt, ice cream, and butter.

2. Nuts

Nuts are the leading cause of severe allergic reactions to food, and affect about 2.5 percent of American children. Peanut allergic reactions include respiratory problems, swelling in the throat, sudden drop in blood pressure, pale skin, blue lips, fainting, and dizziness.

3. Eggs

Eggs are the number two cause of food allergies in children. 68 percent of children who are allergic to eggs can overcome their allergies by the age of 16. Symptoms of an egg allergy usually include:

Indigestion, such as stomach upset;
Skin reactions, such as hives or rash;
Breathing problems;
Anaphylaxis, but rare.

Interestingly, sometimes a person can experience allergies to egg whites, but not to egg yolks, or vice versa. This is because there are differences in the protein in egg whites and yolks.

However, individuals who are allergic to eggs do not always have to avoid all foods that contain eggs, because cooking eggs can change the form of allergy-causing proteins. This can prevent the body from perceiving it as dangerous, and not cause a reaction.

Also Read:Prevent Allergies in Children from an Early Age

4. Seafood

Seafood, both fish and shellfish can cause allergies. Shellfish allergy is one of the most commonly reported in adults and usually appears first in adulthood. In the clam family, the crustacean group: shrimp, lobster and crab most often triggers allergic reactions.

However, many people who are allergic to shellfish can still eat mollusks, such as clams, oysters, and mussels. However, for highly reactive individuals, you should avoid cooking seafood together.

5. Wheat

Wheat allergy is caused by certain proteins present in wheat. Wheat allergy cases are most often experienced by children. However, wheat allergy in children can often be resolved by the time they reach 10 years of age.

Wheat allergy can usually cause indigestion, itching, vomiting, rash, swelling, and anaphylaxis. Not infrequently, people mistake wheat allergy for celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity, because they both exhibit similar digestive symptoms. However, people with a wheat allergy need only avoid wheat and should not avoid gluten from whole grains that do not contain wheat.…